NO FIWOTTS ALLOWED!

Thursday, October 27, 2005

A Good Mormon

Go out and buy a few copies of the Mike Allred Solo if you haven't already. Man, it's fun. It's more fun than playing lazer tag in an abandoned building in the dark, and that's REAL FUN. The art is, of course, beautiful. My favorite story was the Teen Titans party, which is everything that Teen Titans comics should be, but haven't been (in the DCU) since the sixties or so. Get Allred on a Teen Titans title immediately. Quicker than immediately.

There's also an "Adam West" Batman story that certain walking catty stereotypes are taking personally. It's both an allegory about today's superhero comics and an examination of art and philosophy. It's also pretty and fun. Of course, it comes down on the side of "Adolescent, nihilistic superhero comics are pretty stupid." And it's also, generally, preaching to the choir. The folks who are going to agree with Allred are the ones who generally are already reading his stuff. He's right, but I didn't really need to read it. But that almost sounds negative . . .this book is incredibly fun. It is the love of superhero comics. Enjoy it.

Tuesday, October 25, 2005

Coming Soon!

Get ready for...
Image hosted by Photobucket.com

Oh how silly!
Do you think that's ridiculous? Of course you do! Well, on Bizarro World, where it's called "Sexy Chix", it's coming soon from a major publisher. On Bizarro world, BIZARRO LOIS NO MAKE COMICS! WOMEN IN COMICS AM STRANGE! BIZARRO MAKE ANTHOLOGY SHOWING HOW FEW WOMEN MAKE COMICS, IGNORING THE MANY MANY POPULAR FEMALES IN ALTERNATIVE PUBLISHING! DESPITE YEARS AND YEARS OF TOP NOTCH WOMEN CARTOONISTS, BIZARRO ANTHOLOGY WILL FEATURE MANY WRITERS WHO NO DRAW AT ALL!

ON BIZARRO WORLD, "SEXY CHIX" AM GREAT TITLE!

Oh, wait. That's not on Bizarro World at all.

Uh oh....

(This post brought to you by the Bizarro World Chamber of Commerce)

Continuity

Ok, nerds, let's get nerdy.

Today I came upon this quote from a writer I once liked as a younger man, but whose "stuff" I haven't been able to stand since before his first DC tenure was over, Peter David. Let's read, shall we?

"A shared universe, like any fictional construct, hinges on suspension of disbelief. When continuity is tossed away, it tatters the construct. Undermines it."


I read it and got annoyed. [A side note here: I'm trying to write this so that I can still access it from my work computer on my off-periods. There are vulgarity filters at work. I'm finding it rather difficult.]

Let's take it apart, piece by piece.

The first statement is that fictional constructs hinge on suspension of disbelief. I call total horseshit on that. I have never, ever, ever read a comic book or seen a movie where fantastic things were happening and thought, "Hey, yeah, that could happen," or "Hey, that's not possible!" It's fiction. I don't need to believe it. I need to enjoy it or feel enlightened by it. When Wolverine shows up in eleven different books, that doesn't affect my reading of any of them (if I actually read them). Suspension of disbelief is a stupid little crutch that people fall back on when they don't like how something is being done or portrayed. Especially in superhero comics. I can't believe my eyes when I see people complain about losing their "suspension of disbelief" in a book about guys shooting lasers out of their eyes at each other. Where is that line of "Oh, this is total bull now"? It's apparently not at someone flying or breathing water. But one story contradicting another, WHOAAAA NOW! HOLD UP THERE SOLDIER! That's silly. It's some weird anal need for everything in the world to fit together neatly. It doesn't, so why should it in fiction?

Next, "When continuity is tossed away, it tatters the construct." More melodramatic bull. When continuity is tossed away, it frees writers to write stories. Green Lantern: Rebirth had a talented writer and an admirable goal. But the entire thing became so mired in making sure every little continuity point ever was addressed and placated, it became more of a terrible fan fic reference book than a story. A lot of the worst stories in mainstream comics came about from some need to address continuity. Anything with "crisis" in it not written by Grant Morrison or Gardner Fox, for instance. Marvel's X-books post Morrison for another. There may have been good stories written with heavy continuity, but they weren't good because of it, they were good in spite of it.

"It undermines it."

It just blows my mind that there are people out there for whom this is an issue. The "undermining" of the "tapestry" or whatever. It's not a real place, folks. It's a collection of stories. Do you need to believe in it so that you can pretend to be there? Isn't that taking "escapism" a little too far? Let writers write. If they want to tie stories into something else, that's great. If not, don't force it. You'll get a poorer story for it. And loosen up. For proponents of such escapist fare, these continuinerds get all worked up about it. Enjoy the stories you enjoy and ignore the ones you don't. But don't bring other people down because you want everything a certain way. Grow up and let go.

Monday, October 24, 2005

The Fun Stuff

I wanted to highlight some smaller works that deserve greater attention:



Jesse Reklaw over at Slow Wave draws four-panel comics of different people's dreams. They're often surprisingly funny and sad at the same time.

Craig Robinson at the amusingly lo-fi Flip Flop Flyin' has two "What If" charts where, in the first, he plots the possibile turns his life might've taken up until this point, and, in the second, the turns it might still take.

Jason Shiga at Shiga Books has published an online version of his inventively designed choose-your-own-adventure comic book Meanwhile.

Lastly, I'd like to recommend anything by Tom Gauld over at Cabanon Press. His longer works aren't available for viewing online but are well worth buying. Guardians of the Kingdom and Three Very Small Comics, Volume Two are both tours de force of fantastical dry wit.

One week till Halloween

So what could be more gruesome than a Make-Believe War about the horror comic known as Optic Nerve? Read it and find out!

Also note that Optic Nerve is not really a horror comic, but I just desperately needed a segue.